There’s No Ghosts in Grafton

grafton-ghost-townGrafton, not far from Zion National Park, is said to be the most photographed ghost town in the West – and filmmakers through the years have found it to be the perfect backdrop for several movies, including 1929’s “In Old Arizona” – the first talky filmed outdoors.   But no one who has ever seen Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid will forget the memorable “Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head” with Paul Newman and Katherine Ross riding a bicycle through Grafton.

The tiny town of Grafton, part of Brigham Young’s efforts to settle the Utah territory, was established in 1859 as part of the southern Utah cotton mission. The town grew quickly with some 28 families by 1864, each farming about an acre of land. Soon there were irrigation canals and orchards (some which can still be seen providing shade here in the desert).

In June 1997, a partnership was formed including descendants of early Grafton homeowners, the Utah State Historical Society and the state’s Division of State History, the Bureau of Land Management, and others, dedicated to the preservation, protection and preservation of this early settlement.

When you travel to Grafton be sure to bring water and a camera.  The picturesque site is small but there’s lots to see and photograph.  It’s on private property, but open to visitors year round.  Cross the old truss bridge in Rockville – 3 miles west of Springdale on Utah Hwy. 9, then take an immediate turn and drive 3.5 miles west along the dirt road to find the old adobe church and those few remaining structures beneath the red ridges of Zion National Park.

This is one more adventure awaiting you here in Utah’s Dixie and we have a beautiful place for you to stay.  Register online to enjoy the luxurious St. George Resort Rentals.  There’s not a ghost of a chance you will be disappointed. We look forward to serving your vacation needs whether for a week or a month.

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